MAT LANGUAGE COMPREHENSION

TOTAL MARKS : 40                                                           TIME            :     30 MIN

 

Instructions:

 

1.                  Each Question has four choices (a,b,c and d) of which only one is the most appropriate answer.

2.                  All questions carry equal marks

3.                  Every wrong answer would carry negative marking to 1/3

 

Directions for questions (1-5) :  Each of the following questions consist of word in capital letters followed by four words.  Choose the word nearest in meaning to the given word.

 

1.                  DAPPER

a.       Spruce

b.      Slovenly

c.       Awkward

d.      Blunt

2.                  DEBAUCH

a.       Frugal

b.      Ascetic

c.       Decline

d.      Riot

3.                  TUTELARY

a.       Sincere

b.      Protecting

c.       Early

d.      Timid

4.                  SPIRIOUS

a.       Genuine

b.      Mitigated

c.       Glorious

d.      Fake

5.                  PERVERSE

a.       Crotchety

b.      Docile

c.       Amenable

d.      Coerce

 

Directions for Questions (6-10) :  The following sentences carry errors in grammar, usage, diction (choice of words) or idiom.  Identify the part having an error.

 

6.                  (A) The new gambling game

(B) was a grand success

(C) because almost

(D) everyone tried their luck:

a.       A

b.      B

c.       C

d.      D

7.                  (A) His ability to

(B) talk of strangers

(C) is one of his

(D) stronger points

a.       A

b.      B

c.       C

d.      D

8.                  (A) No sooner it started

(B) raining

(C) than

(D) all the passengers closed their windows

a.       A

b.      B

c.       C

d.      D

9.                  (A) Although it is

(B) summer now, the weather at the

(C) hill station was

(D) Quite pleasant

a.       A

b.      B

c.       C

d.      D

10.              (A) the only criteria

(B) to judge a person

(C) is to observe his behavior

(D) when he is in distress

a.       A

b.      B

c.       C

d.      D

 

Directions for questions (11-19):  Read the passages carefully and answer the questions that are given below each passage.  Every question is followed by four responses.  Tick the response, which you feel is the most appropriate one.

 

Passage 1

 

In his book From Athens to Jerusalem [1], Stephen R.L. Clark presents what is possibly the first systematic defense of neo-Platonism since the work of Sanit Augustine.  It is modern book, responding to modern philosophical concerns, but the essence of his doctrine is ancient.  Like Augustine, he feels that truth seeking is a matter of the heart and soul, and maintains that the value of truth is reduced if it has no spiritual content.  If truth is such that it is not worth pursuing at all, despair is the result.  Clark’s neo Platonism is a practical philosophy in the sense that it responds to the condition of despair, a significant problem for many in an age which appears to have abandoned the love of wisdom in favour of dry factuality.

 

Clark contrasts his view with that of people such as Jacques Mond, whose dark conclusions from biological research imply not only that the world is indifferent to us (so that Clark can call him an ‘indifferent’), but that there are no real values [2].  He has chosen well here, for Monod, like Richard Dawkins, is not a philosopher defending a worldview but a scientist stepping outside of his discipline to make large-scale meaning claims with implications for morality and epistemology.  I suspect however that Clark’s arguments may not work as effectively against sophisticated philosophical materialists, who allow for values in their ontology.

 

My purpose in this paper is not to test this suspicion by attempting to refute Clark in every detail.  Rather, I will try to show that if Clark’s argument against neo-Darwinsism in general works, then similar arguments will show that all objective scientific theories must be false.  The problem is partly that his argument does not diagnose the philosophical mistake made by people such as Monod, and instead attacks scientific theory itself.  In may view, the mistake is scientism, the belief that science is the only source of truth and that it can be applied to questions of morality and the inner life.  The result of this mistake is a ridiculous doctrine of indifference, as science provides us with no reason to be interested in life.

 

Clark is correct in thinking that Monod’s view of life is itself unlivable, but he is wrong in claiming that,  for example, the neo-Drawinian theory of human evolution must have implications for the existence of consciousness, or our faith in reason and scholarship.  Monod’s mistake in supposing there are implications is matched by Clark’s error in turning his modus ponens into a modus tollens.  With regard to the value of truth, on the other hand, Clark has an advantage over the materialist, who cannot accept spiritual values of any kind.  Thus even if neo-Darwinism and objective science can be saved from the charge of incoherence (though Monod cannot be), the materialist position is left without an account of the value of truth, and hence has the potential to lead its advocates into a sort of despair.

 

What then is Clark’s argument?  He clearly supports the traditional or ‘absolute’ conceptions of truth, reason and value opposed to the pragmatic and relativist conceptions, for which he has little time [3].  Nevertheless, he presents the problem of skepticism in such a way that is appears to be unsolvable, by considering a situation in which the most certain belief is false [4].  He then claims that there is no solution to the skeptical problem as it is standardly posed, and that if we continue to use reason and pursue knowledge, it must be because we have beliefs that cannot be rationally justified.  That is, we must have faith in rational methods and procedures.  In fact, there are usually a multitude of beliefs which we use daily, as scientists or scholars or simply as people who want to know, all of which ground our inquiries without having a rational justification.

 

So to find out anything, or to suppose that we have found out anything, about the world we need some prior belief about the world.  If I am to benefit from a scientific research I need to believe that my memories are accurate enough, that my colleagues are really human , that a certain mathematical elegance is at least some evidence of the theory’s truth.  None of these claims can be scientifically established, and the attempt to do so would land us in the same trap as the suicidal unfortunate of my first chapter.  We need not just a general faith in what we are doing, but a particular faith that the world is …. Whatever we suppose it is.  And this fact offers us the chance to form some better concept of the world.

 

Whatever the world is supposed to be, we must not suppose that it is a world in which such faith would be impossible, inaccurate, or irrational (by its own standards).  We cannot suppose this, because to do so would subvert the very faith on which our or irrational (by its own standards).  We cannot suppose this, because to do so would subvert the very faith on which our supposition rests.  I cannot believe myself to have discovered that the world is one which remains wholly inscrutable to our enquiries, or one which guarantees that our faith is vain, or one in which it would be ravishingly improbably that any of us should discover or intuit any serious truth about its structure.  If I were to believe these things I should have to abandon the intellectual enterprise [5]

 

Immediately after this passage, Clark discusses the neo-Darwinian theory of evolution, which he thinks must violate our faith that the world is knowable and that rationality is effective.  He claims that the theory provides us with reasons for thinking that there is no such things as consciousness [6], and that it therefore undermines the moral fabric of the whole intellectual life.  This is lquite a feat for a mere theory, and given that so many people believe it, and yet continue to pursue some form of intellectual life, it is clear that they have not ben affected by it in the way that Clark thinks they ought to be.  It is of course important, even though the practical effects of his conclusion are not in evidence, to examine his argument in detail.

 

The crore of Clark’s argument is a structure which depends crucially upon its first premise.  The same structure can be applied to a range of theories with a similar ontology to that of neo- Darwinism, for which a similar first premise can be stated.  The argument runs as follows:

 

1.                  The existence of consciousness is incomprehensible if neo-Darwinism theory is true.

2.                  The existence of consciousness is necessary condition for experiencing the moral obligations of the intellectual life, including the obligation to be rational.

3.                  Therefore, the obligations of the intellectual life, and rationality itself, are incomprehensible if neo-Darwinian theory is true.

 

Clark concludes at this point with the observation that since the theory makes the most obvious of facts incomprehensible, it cannot be acceptable as it stands.  He admits, though in the next paragraph, that neo-Darwinism could have thrown up conscious begins, but that it is difficult to see how beings with ‘world-spanning intelligence’ could evolve-there being no evolutionary advantage to the ability to understand mathematical cosmology, for example [7].  This seems to reduce the strength of his first argument, by allowing that an evolved consciousness is not as incomprehensible as it was supposed to be.

 

The strongest sense of ‘incomprehensible’ details outright impossibility.  There is some evidence that this is precisely the strength that Clark meant to imply when he presented his first argument.  If he did, then adding this as a premise serves not only to strengthen his argument, but makes the second argument unnecessary.  The result of adding this premise is a reductio ad absurdum which neatly expresses the self-refuting character of neo-Darwinism (given the truth of the first premise).  Its second half is therefore as follows:

 

4.                  anything incomprehensible is impossible (i.e. that which is impossible to comprehend is impossible simpliciter)

5.                  Therefore, the neo-Darwinian theory implies that rationality is impossible.

6.                  The neo-Darwinian theory thus refutes itself by denying that anything, including itself, is a rational account of the evolution of manking.

 

Whatever Clark will view this as an acceptable addition depends upon what he means by ‘incomprehensible.  It appears that he sees consciousness as something more than the ability to make tools and exhibit certain kinds of behaviour.  In fact he sees it as something intrinsically subjective, needing no expression in the objective ‘external’ world.  He also links consciousness with moral value and even with the experience of joy [8], which is not associated with any specific type of bahaviour.  All of this is evidence that the additional premises 4 above is acceptable to him, for by understanding consciousness as having no connection with behaviour or objectivity, he effectively claims that there can be no possible evolutionary advantage in its possession.  Hence part of what he means by ‘incomprenehsible’ is impossible’.

 

 

11.              Metaphysical refers to:

a.       Absurd

b.      Abstract

c.       Abstruse

d.      Absorbing

12.              Clarks argument in criticizing Neo-Darwinism lacks in the sense of:

a.       It attacks the scientific basis of the theory itself

b.      It attacks the theory scientific itself

c.       It is silent on the philosophy behind the concept

d.      All the above

13.              Clarks views can be best summarized as subscribing to the ideology of

a.       Spiritualism

b.      Materialism

c.       Idealism

d.      None of these

14.              According to Mr. Clark

a.       There are no solutions to any problem

b.      Problems are generally standard posed

c.       Our beliefs are not rational

d.      All the above

15.              According to Mr. Clark, scientific research is:

a.       Simple mathematics

b.      Absurd nonsense

c.       Tools paradise

d.      Partially truth

16.              According to Neo Darwinism

a.       Sub-consciousness drives humans

b.      Consciousness is all pervading

c.       There is no rationality

d.      Consciousness is in comprehensible

17.              Mathematical cosmology refers to

a.       Astronomy

b.      Mathematics

c.       Geometry

d.      Geodesy

18.              Neo-Darwinism is

a.       Externally inconsistent

b.      Self-contradictory

c.       Internally inconsistent

d.      All the above

19.              The author has a _________ attitude towards Mr. Clark

a.       Positive

b.      Negative

c.       Lukewarm

d.      Non-committal

 

Directions for questions (20-24):  Each Question below has a highlighted word/group of words followed by four other words/group of words.  Choose the word / group of words that is closest in meaning to the highlighted word/group of words.

 

20.              The drunkard was confused and disordered in his thoughts:

a.       Preplexed

b.      Non-plussed

c.       Muddled

d.      Neglected

21.              The officially published book with list of medicine preparations and directions for their use is the source of all drugs we have today:

a.       Pharmacy

b.      Pharmacopoeia

c.       Physiology

d.      Prophylactic

22.              The cheerful readiness with which the office boy discharged his duties endeared him to all his superiors:

a.       Acumen

b.      Alacrity

c.       Fervour

d.      Sincerity

23.              The choreography gave indication of an expert artistic and musical interpretation of the story:

a.       Rendering

b.      Rendition

c.       Meaning

d.      Synopsis

24.              The coast of Kerala abounds in sea creatures that are fit to be eaten:

a.       Swallowed

b.      Consumed

c.       Eatable

d.      Edible

 

 

PASSAGE – 2

 

This paper examines the experience of Korean business in Los Angeles within the context of urban transformation.  Particular attention will be paid to the responses of business to spatial rigidity in the division of labour.  While the literature on immigrant entrepreneurship provides a useful conceptual framework to explain the increasing number of small firms in major cities of Western Europe and North America, the debates on labour supply versus demand tend to fall into the errors of functionalism in explaining the nature of urban change during the past two decades.  They fail to consider multiple responses within ethnic communities under given geographical conditions of reproductions of ethnic labour power.  The principal argument advanced in this paper is that responses to urban transformation diverge between industrial sectors, the ethnic migrant communities and regions (localities).

 

The past two decades of individual change in Los Angles illustrate a typology of selective and systematic disinvestments in the city’s basic productive capacity, including the closures of manufacturing plants in the inner city.  There has been a remarkable flight of capital from productive investment in US industries into ‘unproductive speculation’.  Soja and Davis took divergent paths in terms of sectoral, social and regional configurations, and accentuated sociospatial insulation between different segments of populations.

 

It is important that corresponding transformations in the spatial division of labour did not replace the old divisions.  Instead there was an evolving sequence of partial and selective transformations in the structure of the city’s labour markets.  While many African – Americans in the inner city lost jobs in the heavy industrial sector, the expanding low-wage jobs in service and some manufacturing were primarily taken by new migrants from Latin America and Asia.  This substitution of native blue – collar workers by migrants occurred selectively in industrial sectors.  For example, subcontracting firms, such as garment and auto-parts firms, employed large number of migrant workers, whereas some service, such as hotels, did not necessarily favour migrant workers.  Meanwhile, the whole process of restructuring required spatial rigidity.

 

Because these workers not only competed for the jobs but also had to share the limited supply of low-cost housing in the city.

 

In the case of Korean small business in Los Angeles, the sectoral shift revealed a clear pattern in their specific increasingly in the small firms sector, their shares in both manufacturing and construction sectors experienced accentuated growth between 1975 and 1986.  Even though retail and services together comprised the larger proportion of the total number of firms, they did not reveal the high growth shown in manufacturing and construction, indicating that the growth pattern shifted from retail and services to manufacturing and construction sectors between 1975 and 1986.  Differential rates of growth by industrial sectors articulate the ways in which different parts of capital relate to different segments of labour.  Equally important are the varying competitive strategies pursued by ethnic firms in accordance with community – provided assistance, which lessened some of the structural barriers in the labour markets.  The current round of spatial restructuring, especially the decentralization of industrial activities in Los Angeles, exploits and is exploits and is exploited by the small migrant businesses.  Increasing inter-ethnic strife between ethnic shopkeepers and their neighborhoods is seen as a rational response to these instrumentalities of the spatial division of labour.

 

This paper has four sections.  The first discusses the nature of urban labour  markets in association with industry) labour demand), transational migrants (labour supply) and space (local conditions).  The second examines the association between  the sectoral shift to Korean firms and industrial change in Los Angeles.  The third investigates  the ways in which the production process of Korean firms transforms the nature of the ethnic community, and ethnic labour power in particular.  Finally, I examined the territorial struggle between ethinic communities and their responses to the instrumentalities of spatial restructing.

 

The case study of Korean small businesses in Los Angeles between 1975 and 1986 examines their experiences and responses to the spatiality in urban change.  Various sources of data are used, including the Korean directory of Southern California for 1975 and 1986, the Survey of minority-owned business enterprise for 1977 and 1987, and my own survey of Korean entrepreneurs in Los Angles in 1988.

 

The nature of change in urban labour markets since the 1970s has been dominated by an increase in subcontracted, temporary and self-employment.  Significantly, transnational migrants have been important sources of labour supply in those segments of the labour markets of advances economies.  A large body of research has examined the importance of the politico0economic forces underlying changes in the organization of production at national and continental scales (Piore and Sabel, 1984; Burawoy, 1985; Aglietta, 1987; Lipietz, 1987) .  Other researchers have explored the regional impact of productive forces and the effects of locality on the ensembles of production (Massey 1984, Warde, 1988; Storrper and Walker, 1989).  Still needed is research on the linkage between industrial change and the reproduction of [segments of] labour power at locales.  This research uncovers ways in which local labour markets and wider processes of social and political transformation are interdependent, in that the historically crucial ethnic divisions are reproduced at a place in time.

 

The thesis of labour market segmentation can shed some light on our understanding of the changing requirements of the production process.  The principal argument of the segmentation thesis is that certain portions of the labour forces are forced to bear a disproportionate share of the cost of economic flux and uncertainty.  In terms of wage relations, for example, the firms in more or less ologipolistic sectors rely on capital – intensive technology to enhance productivity and are able to pass on part or all of their wage increases to consumers throughout the market.  However, firms in more competitive sectors are more likely to absorb wage increases themselves.  The rise of competitive pressures, especially those in international markets, is due in part to wage increases in advanced economies.  Large firms are forced to rationalize the scales of production and reorganize work processes.  Flexibility in the procelss of producltion is sought by a massive reduction in firm size, since small firms tend to organize production based on informal labour relations.  This feature opens up new avenues of labour exploitation to meet the unpredictable – JIT, or ‘just in time’ – circumstances.

 

The labour market divisions in accordance with industrial change discussed above have been closely tied to ethnicity / race and migration status (citizenship).  While the economic impact of transnational migrants on urban labour markets centers primarily on their role as a reserved pool of labour to keep overall sectoral wages low, the historical trajectory reveals that the migrant workers have been a primary source of low-wage labour in the United States. Even though recent figures, after the Immigration and Nationality Amendments Act of 1965, indicate a significant increase in the number of better – skilled and better-educated migrants, this overall decomposition of labour markets was a accompanied by a shift in the labour supply of low-wage workers from native-born minorities to transitional migrant workers during the late 1960s and early 1970s.  These facts support the notion that transitional migrants are important during structural transnational migrants are important during structural transformations in both expansionary periods and in economic downturns.  The organizational changes in production cultivate a ‘privileged’ opportunity for some ethnic migrants to operate small subcontracting firms in the garment, auto-parts and construction sectors, while many others work for small firms at lower than minimum wages (Morales 1984; Light and Bonaciach, 1988; Sassen, 1989)

 

The thesis of labour market segmentation is based on the neoclassical economic analysis which sought an equilibriurn between the supply and demand of labour.  The weakness of this thesis is that it fails to account for the importance of social and political processes that help to reproduce the existing divisions in the labour markets.  The supply of labour, especially of transnational migrant workers, is critically conditioned by the federal government through its immigration laws, though we must accept the availability of illegal migrants at the sites of industrial production.  Moreover, the demand-side of labour is conditioned by corporate governance.  Industrial technology does not grow out of self contained logic of economic necessity; rather, determination of which technologies develop depends crucially on political circumstances.  The putative revival of craft production (small firms) since the 1970s (after the golden age of fordism)  suggests how the trade-offs between human labour and technology have been made under corporate restructuring.  Finally, the conditions of local labour markets are also embedded in the social and political characteristics of the regions.  For example, GM’s choice of production sites in the United States (plant closings versus relocations) between the Midwest and the  South was believed to be associated with the locality, including the strength of labour unions and the relationships between the unions and the local governments.

 

Equally important, the differentiation of labour is also achieved in the process of the reproduction of labour power, while segmentation serves to create the qualitatively differentiated labour forces that are required by the economies.  The segmentation thesis, however, neglects the importance of the linkages between the reproduction of labour power and the labour market mechanisms.  To Burawoy, the reproduction of labour power is facilitated by state intervention, welfare policies and factory legislation.  Storper and Walker emphasise a spatial dimension to the segmentation of the labour market; workers engaged in different labour processes are drawn from the constitute different localities.  Warde provides a comprehensive framework for understanding the complex nature of local labour markets.  To Warde, the reproduction of labour power in localities – the ‘local mode or provision’ depends crucially on local politics (different forms and levels of collective consumption) and the behavior of dominant firms.  The argument of these previous studies suggest that the real workings of labour markets – the importance of the political economy embedded in the production technology and in the reproduction of labour power – can only be captured by concrete study of particular spatial conditions over time.

 

The experience of transitional migrants in the urban labour markets provides some evidence of the manner in which (segments of ) labour power are reproduced at a place in time.  For many ethnic migrants, the structure of labour markets is an object of political struggle, since they affect the survival of the ethnic community at the level of urban and national politics.  Even though the increased internationalization of the urban economies of Los Angeles seems to take such economies out of local control, Korean business experience during the 1992 Los Angeles riots suggests that internationalization of the urban economies of Los Angles riots suggests that internationalization helps to ‘reinforce locality – specific responses’-  In the case of Koreans in the United States, especially t

those arriving after 1965, it should be noted that they have relatively highly developed job related skills, but end up with small businesses as owners and workers.  Labour relations in small ethnic firms share some characteristics found in the primary segment, including monopolistic control of the internal labour market.  However, other characteristics, including the ways in which labour market information is circulated and skills are obtained, are similar to the secondary segment.  The dual nature within the enclave economy seems to be supported by the availability of migrant workers, while changes in production technology cultivate low-skill jobs and thus facilitate further labour exploitation.  In this manner, the reproduction costs of ethnic labour power have provided increased flexibility for urban industrial capital.  The experience of Korean businesses in Los Angeles articulates the ways in which production politics are regulated in party by the conflicts arising from the reproduction of labour power, and thus the macro level change of late twentieth-century capitalism relates to the workings of labour market divisions over space.

 

1.                  The author of the passage is a / an :

a.       Economist

b.      Geographer

c.       Anthropologist

d.      Sociologist

2.                  The attitude of the author towards capitalism in the U. S is :

a.       Positive

b.      Negative

c.       Lukewarm

d.      Non-committal

3.                  The style of the author can bee described is :

a.       Lucid

b.      Prosaic

c.       Technical 

d.      Verbose

4.                  The tone of the author is :

a.       Exploratory

b.      Descriptive

c.       Retrospective

d.      Analytical

5.                  Migrant workers substituted native workers in :

a.       Small industries

b.      Heavy industries

c.       Medium industries

d.      All the above

6.                  The highest growth rate between 1975-86 has been observed in case of Korean crisis in :

a.       Manufacturing

b.      Retail

c.       Services

d.      Agriculture

7.                  The spatial restricting in Los Angeles is done by:

a.       Small businesses

b.      Migrant businesses

c.       Large businesses

d.      All the above

8.                  The structure of urban market, is important labour as it determines their

a.       Political aspisaticans

b.      Economic interests

c.       Survival n the market

d.      All the above

Directions for questions (33-37) : Fill the given blanks with appropriate expressions from the choices given.

 

9.                  While it is true that ---------machines free men from hazardous jobs, it is also true that workers are rendered --------by automation.

a.       Robot like, skilled

b.      Automated, redundant

c.       Antiquated, modern

d.      Intelligent, useful

10.              ‘---------‘ means only a --------shade of distinction:

a.       Paradox, fine

b.      Vindication, forceful

c.       Antiquated, modern

d.      Nuisance, perverse

11.              When we face summer, we ------- winter and vice versa, and it is / an ---------- that a man always yearns for what he has not got :

a.       Ask for, aphorism

b.      Carve for, paradox

c.       Love, maxim

d.      Hate, nuisance

12.              Athletic training and techniques have improved so well that in athletics what was ------- yesterday is ------- today:

a.       Unintential, prevaricated

b.      Authentic, fraudulent

c.       Professional, amateurish

d.      Unimaginable, commonplace

13.              Even as the intellectual basis for ‘scientific’ Marxism is said to have ------ many Indian communists reinterpret it as a force for social justice that ---------tyranny a\ [ = pnd oppression :

a.       Collapsed, stands upto

b.      Been defeated, puts aside

c.       Been washed off, puts off

d.      Crumbled, stands by

Directions for questions (38-40) :  Select the odd one out from each of the following.


14.               

a.       Bourgeosis

b.      Elite

c.       Sophisticated

d.      Noble

15.               

a.       Vivacious

b.      Blue

c.       Ebullient

d.      Bubbly

16.               

a.       Morbid

b.      Paternal

c.       Filial

d.      Father

Instructions:

1.      Each question has four choices (a, b, c and d) of which only one is the most appropriate answer.

  1. All questions carry equal marks.
  2. Every wrong answer would carry negative marking to 1/3.

 

Directions for questions (41-105) : Read the questions carefully and choose the correct alterative.

 

17.              If f(x) = g(x)+g(x + 2)  + g(x-4)+g(x+6) and g(x) = 4x+5, then the value of f(-2) is equal to:

a.       3

b.      –3

c.       4

d.      –4

18.              If log an, log bn and log cn are in A.P then, a,b, and C are in the series

a.       A.P.

b.      G.P.

c.       H.P.

d.      None of the above

19.              Sum of the series 4/7  5/73  4/73  5/74 …. To ¥ is equal to

a.       23/28

b.      23/27

c.       27/29

d.      25/27

20.              The product 3 ½  3 ¼  3 1/8 ……..   ¥ is equal to

a.       18

b.      6

c.       9

d.      3

21.              The sum of three number which are in A.P in 15 and their product is 105.  Then the required number are:

a.       3, 5, 7

b.      7, 5, 3

c.       Both a and b

d.      None of these

22.              if 2x+3, 42x-5 = 23a+7, then x = :

a.       7

b.      6

c.       4

d.      3

23.              Find the number of ways in 5 identical balls can be distributed among 10 boxes identical boxes if not more than 1 ball can go into a box

a.       250

b.      252

c.       242

d.      260

24.              If 7Pr = 210, find the value of r:

a.       3

b.      4

c.       5

d.      2

25.              From a pack of 52 cards, 3 cards are drawn what is probability that it has one ace and two jacks:

a.       1/2550

b.      600

c.       6 / 5525

d.      5525

26.              A bag contains 5 red and 5 black balls.  Two draws of three balls each made, the ball being replaced after the first draw.  What is the change that the balls were red in the finest draw and black in the second:

a.       14

b.      14 / 2449

c.       140 /2449

d.      140 /20449

27.              How many words can be found with the letters of the word EQUATION

a.       4030

b.      4032

c.       40320

d.      40302

28.              If “C2 = “C5; the n the value of n is equal to

a.       11

b.      9

c.       5

d.      7

29.              A tradesman’s charges are 20% over cost price, he allows his customers 10% of their bills for each payment.  His net gain percent is:

a.       Rs.10

b.      Rs.8

c.       Rs.12

d.      Rs.20

30.              A worker earned Rs.20/- on one day and spent Rs.15/- on the next day.  He gain earned Rs.20/- on the third day and spent Rs.15/- on the fourth day and so on.  On which he first have Rs.60/- with him.

a.       17th day

b.      18th day

c.       19th day

d.      15th day

31.              8 men or 6 women can do a piece of work in 20 days.  In how many days will 12 men and 8 women do the same work:

a.       3 days

b.      2 ½

c.       3 ½

d.      3 ¾

32.              If A gets 25% more than B and B  gets 20% more than C.  The share C out of a sum of Rs.740 is:

a.       100

b.      200

c.       300

d.      150

33.              Passenger train running at the speed of 80 km/hr.  Leaves the railway station 6 hrs after a goods train leaves and overtakes it in 4 hrs.  What is the speed of goods train.

a.       32 km/hr

b.      30 km/hr

c.       25 km/hr

d.      35 km/hr

34.              A trader sells 9 bullocks and 7 cows for Rs.30,000 to a customer and to another customer he sells B bullocks and 13 cows at the same price for the same sum.  Then the price of the bullock is

a.       Rs.2000

b.      Rs.2400

c.       Rs.3000

d.      Rs.3500

35.              If two numbers are respectively 20% and 50% of the third number, what percentage is the first number of the second one:

a.       40

b.      60

c.       50

d.      30

Krishna started a business with a capital of Rs.9000.  Four months later Rani

1.                  joined him with a capital of Rs.12,000.  At the end of the year total profit earned was Rs.2550.  Find the Rani’s share in the profit.

a.       Rs.1000

b.      Rs.1200

c.       Rs.1220

d.      Rs.1500

2.                  Two numbers are respectively 30% and 40% more than the third number.  What % is the first number of the second:

a.       100

b.      92 6/7

c.       95

d.      85 1/5

3.                  The father is five times older to his son.  After 4 years, the sum of their ages would be 44 years.  Then the son’s age at present is

a.       8 years

b.      4 years

c.       6 years

d.      10 years

4.                  Ramesh can finish a job in 20 days and suresh in 25 days.  They start working together but after 5 day’s Suresh leaves.  In how many more days Ramesh alone can finish the work:

a.       10 days

b.      15 days

c.       11 days

d.      12 days

5.                  The difference between the length and breadth of a rectangle is 23 m.  If the perimeter of the rectangle is 206 m, Find its area:

a.       2220 m2

b.      2420m2

c.       2250m2

d.      2520m2

6.                  In an examination, 35% of the total students failed in Hindi, 45% failed in English and 20% in both.  What % of total students passed in both the subjects:

a.       40

b.      60

c.       30

d.      50

7.                  If 12 men can finish a work in 20 days, then in how many days 15 men will complete that work:

a.       10 days

b.      14 days

c.       15 days

d.      16 days

8.                  Average age of 30 boys in  class is 10 years, If however, the age of their teacher is also included then the average increased by one year, what is the age of teacher:

a.       25 years

b.      30 years

c.       41 years

d.      36 years

9.                  Smitha’s mother was 4 times as old as Smitha 10 years back.  After 10 years, her age will be twice as that of Smith’s age.  Find the present age of Smitha:

a.       25 years

b.      20 years

c.       28 years

d.      22 years

10.              Dilip buys a radio at ¾ of its value and sells it for 20% more than its value.  What is his gain:

a.       30%

b.      40%

c.       50%

d.      60%

11.              If a train is running at the speed of 86.4 per km hours, then how much difference will it covers in 10 minutes:

a.       14.4 km

b.      15 km

c.       16.4 km

d.      20 km

 

12.              In fig (A).  Find area of shaded region if ABC is an equilateral triangle of sides 6 cm:

A

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


a.       (3Ö3-p)cm2

b.      3(3Ö-p)cm2

c.       (3-p)cm2

d.      (Ö3+p)cm2

13.              The side of a triangle are as 13:14:15 and its area is 756sq.m  Find its sides:

a.       39 cm, 42cm, 45 cm

b.      40 cm, 45cm, 50 cm

c.       10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm

d.      None of these

14.              If log8x+log4x+log2x=11, the value of x:

a.       128

b.      140

c.       84

d.      64

15.              Find the value of Sin260 + Cos230 + tan245 + Sec230:

a.       Ö3

b.      3 5/6

c.       Ö5

d.      1

16.              If (x+2) exactly divides x3+6x+11x + 6k; find the value of K:

a.       0

b.      2

c.       1

d.      –1

17.              Three pipes A, B and C can fill a tank in 6 hours.  After working at it for 2 hours, C is closed and A and B can fill it in 7 hours.  The time required to C to fill the tank in alone in:

a.       10 hrs

b.      12 hrs

c.       14 hrs

d.      16 hrs

18.              A train of length 150m takes 10 seconds to pass over another train 100m long coming from the opposite direction.  If the speed of the first train in 30 kmph, the speed of the second train is

a.       54 km/hr

b.      60 km/hr

c.       72 km/hr

d.      36 km/hr

19.              In a right angled DABC right angled at A, if AD^BC such that AD = P if BC = a, CA = b and AB = c then:

a.       P2 = b2 + c2

b.      1/p2 = 1/b2 = 1/c2

c.       p/a = p/b

d.      p2 = b2 c2

20.              The value of sin 180 is:

a.       Ö5+1 / 4

b.      Ö3+1 /2

c.       Ö3-1 /2

d.      Ö5 – ¼

21.              A bag contains 5 and 4 black balls.  Thee balls are drawn at random.  What is the probability that 2 are blue and 1 is black:

a.       1/3

b.      2/5

c.       1/6

d.      none

 

 

MAT – DATA ANALYSIS & SUFFICIENCY

 

TOTAL MARKS :  40                                                 TIME  :  35 MIN.

 

Instructions:

 

1.                  Each question has four choices (a, b, c and d) of which only one is the most appropriate answer.

2.                  All questions carry equal marks

3.                  Every wrong answer would carry negative marking to 1/3.

 

Directions for Questions (81-85) :  A sales executive travels in the following metros for promoting sales.  In this way, he travels by road or rail.  The table shows the TA per km.  In different cities and distance, traveled in different cities.  Study the data and answer the Questions.

 

City

Distance traveled

Distance by rail : Distance by road

TA Per km

 

(km.)

 

Rail(Rs.)

Road (Rs.)

Delhi

216

11:1

6.30

7.60

Calcutta

2128

3:16

6.45

5.50

Chennai

1764

5:13

6.80

7.20

Mumbai

1675

7:18

6.45

8.15

Hyderabad

728

4:9

8.35

5.85

Bangalore

1008

1:7

5.75

6.95

Lucknow

512

3:1

6.05

8.05

 

22.              In Mumbai, distance traveled by road is what percent of distance traveled by road in Bangalore:

a.       136.73%

b.      1372.22%

c.       166.7%

d.      189.9%

23.              What is the TA earned by him while traveling in Calcutta by Rail:

a.       Rs.1105.50

b.      Rs.980.60

c.       Rs.1648.00

d.      Rs.2167.20

24.              In which of the following cities does he travel maximum distance by rail:

a.       Calcutta

b.      Mumbai

c.       Chennai

d.      Hyderabad

25.              TA earned by him in Lucknow by road and by rail are in what ratio approximately

a.       3:5

b.      2:5

c.       1:3

d.      2:3

26.              Total TA earned by him in Delhi and Lucknow adds to What:

a.       Rs.4223.6

b.      Rs.4737.72

c.       Rs.3772.0

d.      Rs.5110.9

 

Directions for questions (86-90) :  A starts business by investing Rs.26000.  He is subsequently joined by B, C, D, E and F by investing some money.  Their profit at the end of the year is shown in the graph, while the dashed line shows the distribution of the same profit if they had invested and started business together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A         B          C         D         E          F

 
 

 

 

 


27.              What is the amount invested by C in business:

a.       Rs.17000

b.      Rs.14500

c.       Rs.16500

d.      Rs.15000

28.              What time later did E invest money after B joining the business:

a.       2 months

b.      3 months

c.       4 months

d.      5 months

29.              Who has invested the maximum money:

a.       A

b.      B

c.       C

d.      E

30.              Money invested by C is what % of money invested by F

a.       29.8%

b.      33.7%

c.       45.3%

d.      39.4%

31.              How many months later and which what amount did D join the business after a started:

a.       4, Rs.28000

b.      3, Rs.32000

c.       4, Rs.17500

d.      6, Rs.12500

 

Directions for questions (91-95) : Study the following tables carefully and answer the Questions given below.

 

Foreign exchange reserve in selected countries during 1995-1999 in (US $ billion)

Country

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

India

20.6

22.4

32.4

34.2

36.8

China

20.6

41.8

36.8

38.4

47.2

Indonesia

10.2

15.9

17.2

16.5

19.7

Malaysia

30.4

28.6

33.4

35.6

36.2

S. Korea

25.4

36.7

38.6

40.7

39.2

Thailand

29.6

34.2

30.8

39.6

42.3

 

 

32.              What was the approximate % increases in foreign exchange reserves of Malaysia from 1997 to 1999:

a.       8

b.      6

c.       12

d.      10

33.              What was the difference in the foreign exchange reserves of India between 1997 and 1998, if the value of one dollar was Rs.44/-

a.       Rs.8040Cr.

b.      Rs.7280Cr

c.       Rs.6920Cr

d.      Rs.7920Cr

34.              In which of the following countries was there deficit in the foreign exchanges reserves in one or more given years:

a.       In all countries

b.      In all countries except South Korea

c.       China, Malaysia and Thailand

d.      In all countries except India

35.              In which of the following countries foreign exchange reserves approximately doubled in 1999 from that of 1995:

a.       Malaysia

b.      South Korea

c.       Indonesia

d.      India

36.              What is the GDP of India in 1989

a.       54 billion

b.      23 billion

c.       cannot be determined

d.      300 billion

 

Directions for questions (96 to 105)  : Each questions is followed by two statements I & II

 

Mark a.            If statement I alone can answer the question

Mark b             If statement II alone can answer the question

Mark c             If statement I & II together can answer the question

Mark d             If statement I & II together are not sufficient to answer the question

 

37.              Is c equal to 7

                                                               i.      The arithmetic means of a, b & c is 0

                                                             ii.      B = -c

38.              There are 40 men in hall.  How many are wearing both Jackets & ties

                                                               i.      25 are wearing Jackets

                                                             ii.      22 are wearing ties

39.              Is Miss Kim more than 55 years of age

                                                               i.      Ten years ago she was more than 55 years of age

                                                             ii.      Ten years ago she was more than 45 years of age

40.              What is the value of r:

                                                               i.      Q – r = r – p – z

                                                             ii.      P + q + z = 20

41.              Is m < n ? m & n are real numbers

                                                               i.      m2 = 49

                                                             ii.      n = 8

42.              What is the value of x

                                                               i.      n2 – 4n + 3 = 0

                                                             ii.      n2 – 2n + 1 = 0

43.              P, Q, R, S, T are in G.P.  Is the common ratio negative

                                                               i.      P, Q, R, S, T is positive

                                                             ii.      Q < P

44.              P is positive .  R is also positive.  Which is the greatest among P, Q & R.

                                                               i.      P + Q + R = 27

                                                             ii.      P = Q = 4

45.              Is Sandeep taller than Saurabh

                                                               i.      Sandeep is not shorter than Saurabh

                                                             ii.      Sandeep & Saurabh are not equal I height

46.              How many voted for Pramod Mahajan

                                                               i.      Not more than 150 people voted for him

                                                             ii.      More than 148 people voted for him

 

 

 

Directions for questions (106-110) :  Five friends : Saurav, Sachin, Dravid, Kumble & Srinath occupy a 7 storyed building.  Floors are numbered from 1 to 7, from ground floor to the top floor.  No floor has more than 1 occupant.  Dravid stays 2 floors above Kumble but below Saurav.  Everybody lives on floors below Sachin and above Srinath’s.  The sum of the occupied floor number is 21.

 

47.              Kumble cannot occupy

a.       3rd

b.      4th

c.       5th

d.      (a) & (b)

48.              Which floor can Srinath occupy

a.       Ist

b.      3rd

c.       4th

d.      5th

49.              Which floor is necessarily occupied

a.       1st

b.      2nd

c.       4th

d.      5th

50.              How many floors are there between Dravid & Srinath

a.       1

b.      2

c.       3

d.      none of these

51.              On which floor does Sachin stays

a.       5th

b.      6th

c.       7th

d.      none of these

 

 

Directions for questions (111-115) :  Ritik is going to attend six stage shows in Madurai, Nagpur, Pune, Lucknow, Ranchi & Srinagar.  He has to attend these in next six days according to these conditions.

(i)                  He must attend Madurai before Nagpur & Ranchi

(ii)                He must attend Nagpur before Lucknow

(iii)               Third stage show must be in Pune

(iv)               

52.              Which of the following must be true:

a.       He attends Madurai before Lucknow

b.      Attends Nagpur before Ranchi

c.       Attends Pune before Madurai

d.      Attends before Srinagar

53.              If the visits Luknow immediately before Ranchi and immediately after Srinagar, he must attend show in Lucknow.

a.       First

b.      Second

c.       Fourth

d.      Fifth

54.              If the attends show in Srinagar first, which is followed by which city :

a.       Nagpur

b.      Pune

c.       Madurai

d.      Lucknow

55.              He could attend any of these show immediately after pune except.

a.       Srinagar

b.      Madurai

c.       Lucknow

d.      Can’t say

56.              Which is correct order of shows:

a.       Madurai, Srinagar, Nagpur, Ranchi, Madurai

b.      Lucknow, Nagpur, Srinagar, Pune, Ranchi, Madurai

c.       Srinagar, Nagpur, Lucknow, Pune, Ranchi, Madurai

d.      None of these.

 

Directions for questions (116 – 120) : Refer to the pie chart below and answer the question profits in an industry in year 1990 – 1991 and 1992-93

Profits in an industry in years 1991-92

Operating profit 160 crores                                

 
 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

57.              By what percentage did the operating profit increase

a.       21.3%

b.      20.1%

c.       19.3%

d.      23.1%

58.              By what amount (in Rs. Lakhs) did the interest burden decrease in 1991-92

a.       6400

b.      2500

c.       2600

d.      400

59.              If 20% was the rate of interest on borrowed loans, what was the actual loan amount in 1990-91

a.       Rs.195 crore

b.      Rs.175 crore

c.       Rs.78 crore

d.      Rs.260 crore

60.              What was the difference in dividend amount, in the two years considering that the equity remained the same

a.       Rs.128 crore

b.      Rs.10.2 crore

c.       Rs.4.2 crore

d.      Rs.2.4 crore

61.              By what percentage did the retained profit change in the year 1991-92

a.       42%

b.      53.8%

c.       27.4%

d.      10.56%

 

MAT – INTELLEGENCE & CRITICAL REASONING

TOTAL MARKS : 40                                                              TIME : 30 MIN.

 

Instructions:

1.                  Each question has four choices (a, b, c, and d) of which only one is the most appropriate answer.

2.                  All questions carry equal marks

3.                  Every wrong answer would carry negative marking to 1/3

 

Direction for question (121-126):  Find the odd one from the following

 

 

1.                  (a)     DEGH           (b)  PQSV        (c)  WXZC             (d)  QSUW

2.                  (a)     TRNP           (b)  LJFH         (c)  SQLN              (d)  GEAC

3.                  (a)     DBWY         (b)  HFSU        (c)  GETV              (d)  JKSQ

4.                  (a)     XWZY          (b)  LKON       (c)  QPSR              (d)  TSUV

5.                  (a)     HD4              (b)  PJ6            (c)  UQ4                (d)  WK9

6.                  (a)     NG8M          (b)  FM11H      (c)  JB9E                (d)  WZ31R

 

 

 

Direction for question (127-130):  The questions are based on the arrangement of letters in the word IMAGINATION.

7.                  How many sets of two letters have as many letters between them as they have in the alphabets:

a.       1

b.      2

c.       3

d.      4

8.                  If the leters used in the word were arranged in alphabetical order, (letters used more than once would be counted as one only), which letter would be exactly in the middle:

a.       M

b.      N

c.       G

d.      I

9.                  Which letter in the word is exactly in the middle of 8th letter from your left and 6th letter from your right:

a.       M

b.      A

c.       I

d.      G

10.              If all the eleven letters of the word to be arranged alphabetically, how many letters will still remain where they are :

a.       1

b.      2

c.       3

d.      4

 

 

Direction for question (131 – 135) : In each of the following questions three elements have been mentioned.  The same places are represented by a combination of figures, each figure representing one of the elements.  Your task is to match the right set to elements with the right figure:

 

 


                                                          

 

 

 


 

11.              Ganga: Yammna: Allahabad:

a.       Fig A

b.      Fig B

c.       Fig C

d.      Fig D

12.              M. P. Rajasthan: Chambal:

a.       Fig A

b.      Fig B

c.       Fig D

d.      Fig C

13.              Yamuna: Mathura: Agra:

a.       Fig A

b.      Fig B

c.       Fig C

d.      Fig D

14.              Taj Mahal: Dehli: Qutub Minar:

a.       Fig A

b.      Fig C

c.       Fig D

d.      Fig E

15.              Gateway of India : The Arbian sea : Mumbai

a.       Fig A

b.      Fig B

c.       Fig D

d.      Fig E

 

Direction for question (136-140) :  Each question has two items with a definite relationship between them.  You have to find out from (a), (b), (c) and (d) the pair of words that has the same relationship between the two items as the ones given in the question.

 

16.              Latch : door

a.       Stone : floor

b.      Oar : boat

c.       Nib : pen

d.      Button : shirt

17.              Retina : eye

a.       Taste : tongue

b.      Petal : flower

c.       Hand : foot

d.      Glass: drink

18.              Faction : Political party

a.       Bronze : metal

b.      Friction : friendship

c.       War : countries

d.      Crime : law

19.              Nightingale : Cuckoo

a.       Dance : music

b.      Snake : tiger

c.       Alligator : chameleon

d.      Cream : milk

20.              Dragon : china

a.       Dalai Lama : Tibet

b.      Camel : desert

c.       Voo-doo : Negroes

d.      Sphinx : Egypt

 

Direction for question (141-145) :  Find the odd one from the following group of words given below.

 

21.              (a)     Snarl             (b)  Growl         (c)  Gnash               (d)  Caress

22.              (a)     Taurus           (b)  Gemini        (c)  Zodiac              (d)  Libra

23.              (a)     Pi                  (b)  Beta           (c)  Delta                (d)  Aorta

24.              (a)     Dram             (b)  Chain         (c)  Metre               (d)  Furlong

25.              (a)     Yen               (b)  Dollar         (c)  Taka                (d)  Ounce

 

Direction for question (146-150) :  In each of the following questions, a number series is given.  Below this series a number is given followed by (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E).  After understanding the pattern in the given number series, you have to form another number series in the same order, starting from the given number.

 

26.              5             4             6                15              56

                  (A)          (B)          (C)             (D)             (E)

                  7

                  Which of the following number will come in place of (D)                             

 

a.       84

b.      94

c.       104

d.      107

27.              71           73           79              81              87

                  (A)          (B)          (C)             (D)             (E)

            95

            Which of the following numbers will come in place of (E):

 

a.       113

b.      109

c.       107

d.      108

28.              1             2             4                8                16

                  (A)          (B)          (C)             (D)             (E)

                  3

                  Which of the following numbers will come in place of (C)

 

a.       15

b.      12

c.       18

d.      24

29.               7            11           23              59              167

                  (A)          (B)          (C)             (D)             (E)

                  6

                  Which of the following numbers will come in place of (C)

a.       54

b.      47

c.       42

d.      32

30.               100        121         144            169            196

                  (A)          (B)          (C)             (D)             (E)

                  4

                  Which of the following numbers will come in place of (D)

a.       42

b.      49

c.       36

d.      25

 


MAT – INDIAN AND GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT

TOTAL MARKS : 40                                                              TIME : 15 MIN

 

Instructions:

1.      Each question has four choices (a, b, c and d) of which only one is the most appropriate answer.

2.      All questions carry equal marks

3.      Every wrong answer would carry negative marking to 1/3.

 

Directions  for questions (151 – 200) :  Read the questions carefully and choose the correct alternative

31.                    What forms the main theme of Ajanta paintings

a.       Jatka stories

b.      Stores from Mahabharata

c.       Stories from Ramayana

d.      Panchatantra

32.              Smallest State in the world in terms of area is

a.       Nauru

b.      Monaco

c.       Seychelles

d.      Vatican

33.              Barren Island is famous because it has:

a.       No population

b.      No cultivation

c.       Active volcano

d.      Non-availability of potable water

34.              Name the folk dance of Rajasthan

a.       Garba

b.      Ghumar

c.       Jhumar

d.      Kathak

35.              Match the ancient Indian Dynasty with the Capital from which it rules:

a.       Pallavas                        a. Dhilika

b.      Chalukyas                    b. Kanchipuram

c.       Hoysalas                      c. Vatapi

d.      Tomars             d. Dwarsamudra

 

  1. A –a, 2-b, 3-c, 4-d
  2. 1 – c, 2-a, 3-b, 4-d
  3. 1 – b, 2-c, 3-d, 4-a
  4. 1 –d, 2 – a 3-c, 4-b

 

36.              British shifted the Imperial Capital from Calcutta to Delhi is:

a.       1905

b.      1909

c.       1911

d.      1914

37.              What name is given to the design drawn by the women of Tamil Nadu on their floors and thresholds using pastes and powders

a.       Madna

b.      Alpana

c.       Kolam

d.      Rangoli

38.              The State of Indian Union, which will rank lowest on the basis of population residing in its territory, is :

a.       Manipur

b.      Meghalayas

c.       Sikkim

d.      Mizoram

39.              The State og Indian Union, which is best suited for growth of some of the rarest Orchids, is

a.       Himachal Pradesh

b.      Arunachal Pradesh

c.       Garhwal region of Uttar Pradesh

d.      Nagaland

40.              In the Battle of Wandiawash of 1760, the English defeated

a.       The Dutch

b.      The French

c.       The Germans

d.      The Portuguese

41.              Who was the author of Unto This Last

a.       Bonceref

b.      Tolstoy

c.       Ruskin

d.      Thoreau

42.              Which is the middle tier of Panchyati Raj in India

a.       Zila Parishad

b.      Gram Sabha

c.       Gram Panchyat

d.      Panchyat Samiti

43.              No person can be employed in factories or mines unless he is above the age of

a.       12 years

b.      14 years

c.       18 years

d.      20 years

44.              Ms. Tansu Ciller was the Prime Minister of

a.       Indonesia

b.      Iceland

c.       Turkey

d.      Latvia

45.              Name the artist who started his career as painter of cinema posters

a.       Satish Gujral

b.      M.F. Hussain

c.       Parmjit Singh

d.      Ganesh Pyne

46.              When a constant force is applied to a body it moves with uniform:

a.       Momentum

b.      Velocity

c.       Speed

d.      Acceleration

47.              Which one of the following is an item included in the list of Fundamental Duties of an Indian citizen in the Constitution

a.       To practice secularism

b.      To develop scientific temper, humanism and the spirit of inquiry and reform

c.       To pay all taxes to government regularly and correctly

d.      Not to assault any public servant during the performance of his duties

48.              The silvered surface of thermos flask prevents transfer of heat by

a.       Conduction

b.      Convection

c.       Reflection

d.      Radiation

49.              Soil wste disposal should be done by

a.       Sanitary land fill

b.      Incineration

c.       Composting

d.      All the above three

50.              Smog is a common pollutant in places having excessive amount in the air of

a.       Sulphur dioxide

b.      Ammonia

c.       Nitrogen

d.      Oxygen

51.              The price system ensures

a.       Efficiency in production

b.      Equity in distribution

c.       Allocation of goods to those who can pay for it

d.      Optimum utilization of resources

52.              Which of the following pairs of commodities is an example of substitute goods

a.       Pen and Ink

b.      Left shoe and Right shoe

c.       Mustard oil and Coconut oil

d.      Gold and water

53.              Which one of the following could best be regardsed as an ‘entrepreneur’

a.       A bank manager

b.      A football club manager

c.       A sale girl in a dress shop

d.      A grain merchant

54.              Which one of the following crops is sown for green manicuring

a.       Arhar

b.      Urad

c.       Gram

d.      Peas

55.              New Industrial Policy resolution of 1991 proposed

a.       Abolition of all industrial licensing

b.      Direct Foreign Investment upto 51% equity in priority industries

c.       Foreign Technology agreements on the merit of individual cases

d.      Conversion of public sector enterprises to private enterprises

56.             
Which one of the following represent the dark, thick rain clouds

a.       Cirrus

b.      Cumulonimbus

c.       Cumulus

d.      Stratus

57.              The Rashtrakuta king who constructed the famous Rock-cut Siva temple at Ellora was

a.       Dantidurga

b.      Govinda III

c.       Amoghavarsha

d.      Krishna I

58.              “Portfolio management” means an effort to

a.       Minmise tax liability

b.      Maximise yield with safety of financial investments

c.       Raise loans in accordance with needs of the borrowing company Raising loans at least possible interest cost

59.              Milk lacks in one important nutrient – which

a.       Calcium

b.      Iron

c.       Potassium

d.      Protein

60.              Tube light works on the principle of

a.       Chemical effect of current

b.      Heating effect of current

c.       Magnetic effect of current

d.      Discharge of electricity through gases

61.              How much percentage of world’s livestock population is in India

a.       10%

b.      32%

c.       23.5%

d.      14%

62.              As per census – 1991, which of the following is not correct

a.       Life expectancy : 59 years

b.      Infant Mortality rate (0-4 year age-group): 26.5%

c.       Gross fertility rate : 3.6

d.      All are correct

63.              The total area in India under water logging (type) situation is:

a.       2 million hectares

b.      6 million hectares

c.       30 million hectares

d.      182 million hectares

64.              Which of the following combinations has been wrongly matched

a.       Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG)- V.K. Shingloo

b.      University Grants commission chairman – H.P. Gautam

c.       Chairman Joint Intelligence Committee-Satish Chandra

d.      Chairman U.P.S.C. – Lt. Gen. Surinder Nath

65.              Which of the following has been wrongly matched

a.       Markets lead to road of Specialisation and Profits depending on the division of Labour – Adam Smith

b.      Development Economics is a saga of per-capita Income growth-related thinking-Ian little

c.       Laissez-faire (fre trade) – Adam Smith

d.      All are correct

66.              Mr. Alejandro Toleda was in the news recently.  He is

a.       Emerging as a prominent leader of opposition in Peru (in term of challenge to Mr. Fujimori’s Presidency)

b.      A leader of Panhellenic Socialist movement (PASOK) which won election in Greece recently

c.       UN’s new under-Secretary general

d.      The newly appointed prime minister of Belgium

67.              The number of the UN security council resolutions related to south Asian Nuclear tests (Roll-back) are

a.       1172

b.      1186

c.       978

d.      1085

68.              The government recently cleared the bid (by India) for the Asian Games (for N. Delhi) – for which year

a.       2004

b.      2008

c.       2006

d.      2010

69.              The amount of money raised by Indian Corporates in equity through GDR/ADR route (According to a primary capital market database (PRIME) in 1999-2000 fiscal) is/was

a.       Rs.4,946 crore

b.      Rs.1,367 crore

c.       Rs. 10,856 crore

d.      Rs.17,346 crore

70.              The percentage of villages with Health care facilities in Indian in 1981 (in percentage) was:

a.       40%

b.      60%

c.       14%

d.      29.3%

 

Objective Solutions


 

 



1.          

B

2.          

D

3.          

C

4.          

D

5.          

A

6.          

D

7.          

D

8.          

A

9.          

C

10.      

A

11.      

B

12.      

D

13.      

D

14.      

C

15.      

D

16.      

D

17.      

A

18.      

B

19.      

D

20.      

C

21.      

B

22.      

B

23.      

B

24.      

D

25.      

A

26.      

B

27.      

A

28.      

D

29.      

D

30.      

A

31.      

A

32.      

C

33.      

B

34.      

C

35.      

B

36.      

D

37.      

A

38.      

A

39.      

B

40.      

A

41.      

C

42.      

B

43.      

A

44.      

D

45.      

C

46.      

A

47.      

B

48.      

A

49.      

C

50.      

D

51.      

C

52.      

D

53.      

B

54.      

A

55.      

D

56.      

C

57.      

A

58.      

B

59.      

A

60.      

B

61.      

B

62.      

C

63.      

C

64.      

D

65.      

A

66.      

D

67.      

C

68.      

B

69.      

D

70.      

A

71.      

B

72.      

A

73.      

A

74.      

B

75.      

C

76.      

C

77.      

B

78.      

B

79.      

D

80.      

C

81.      

A

82.      

D

83.      

C

84.      

B

85.      

B

86.      

B

87.      

B

88.      

D

89.      

C

90.      

D

91.      

A

92.      

D

93.      

D

94.      

A

95.      

C

96.      

D

97.      

D

98.      

A

99.      

C

100.  

C

101.  

B

102.  

D

103.  

C

104.  

C

105.  

D

106.  

D

107.  

A

108.  

C

109.  

D

110.  

C

111.  

A

112.  

D

113.  

C

114.  

B

115.  

A

116.  

D

117.  

D

118.  

D

119.  

D

120.  

B

121.  

D

122.  

C

123.  

D

124.  

B

125.  

D

126.  

C

127.  

C

128.  

A

129.  

B

130.  

B

131.  

C

132.  

D

133.  

A

134.  

D

135.  

B

136.  

D

137.  

B

138.  

B

139.  

C

140.  

D

141.  

D

142.  

C

143.  

D

144.  

A

145.  

D

146.  

C

147.  

A

148.  

B

149.  

D

150.  

C

151.  

C

152.  

D

153.  

a

154.  

D

155.  

B

156.  

D

157.  

B

158.  

B

159.  

C

160.  

D

161.  

A

162.  

D

163.  

B

164.  

B

165.  

C

166.  

C

167.  

D

168.  

C

169.  

B

170.  

B

171.  

C

172.  

D

173.  

C

174.  

C

175.  

B

176.  

A

177.  

B

178.  

A

179.  

B

180.  

B

181.  

C

182.  

D

183.  

C

184.  

C

185.  

B

186.  

A

187.  

B

188.  

A

189.  

D

190.  

A

191.  

D

192.  

C

193.  

B

194.  

D

195.  

D

196.  

A

197.  

A

198.  

C

199.  

A

200.  

C